Order information for your Shopping Cart

PARKING PARTNERS

What Did You Think of RED-EYE?

images-2

Thank you for attending ArtsEmerson’s presentation of Lucidity Suitcase Intercontinental’s of RED-EYE to HAVRE de GRACE. Please take a moment to reflect on your experience of seeing this show and let us know what you think.

RED-EYE has a unique flow to it, almost like a film. Have you seen that in other theatrical pieces? What did you think?

Did RED-EYE change your perception of Edgar Allan Poe?

What do you think the production would have been like without the music? With different music?

What did you think of the movement part of the piece?

What did you think of the performances?

Are you familiar with the character of Edgar Allan Poe? Do you think this was an accurate portrayal?

9 Comments

  1. Frances Shedd-FisherFebruary 14, 2014 at 11:31 am

    I thought the production Red-Eye to Havre de Grace was very exciting theatre. The performers were all superb. I loved the flow/
    movement and the creative staging design. I actually learned a lot about Poe that I did not know – very interesting and moving and
    sometimes funny
    .
    I thought the music/sound effects very effective, but my only criticism is that the music was too loud for the voices, Poe, specifically,
    to be heard clearly sometimes.

    Thanks for bringing this to Boston.

    Reply
  2. Brilliant–creative staging, inspired music, and utterly wonderful performances by all. This work has changed my view of Poe, humanizing him while respecting his brooding and disturbed genius. Many thanks for bringing this amazing work to Boston.

    Reply
  3. Last night we have been to the Paramount Theater for the performance of “Red-Eye to Havre de Grace.” The theme of the play is morbid, the last days of life of deranged Edgar Allen Poe. If it would not be for ingenious staging, musical background and acting, the play could be drab and depressing. AEP, a delusional alcoholic poet obsessed with horror stories, his dead wife and origins of the universe among other things, dies a mysterious death. This story was translated into several theatrical languages, and delivered to us as a coherent multi-genre piece where each voice is heard. A rhythmical cacophony of eery sounds of a ripped piano together with spooky acrobatics added to mystery of the narrative. The play received a standing ovation. Overall, it was a captivating original performance.

    Reply
  4. Geoffrey PingreeFebruary 15, 2014 at 12:24 pm

    It as like madness.
    Very moved by the production (warning, there may be a few spoilers in the following)
    Very inventive musically, aurally, visually and in terms of movement and use of set – very atmospheric, dark – a true ‘gesamtkunstwerk’.
    I was unaware of the strangeness of Poe’s last days or of his final work ‘Eureka’. A very compelling evocation of madness, almost frighteningly so. The effect reminded me of Berlioz ’ Symphonie Fantastique’.
    Strange, and interesting Louis CK character interleaved with the action – At first I was not sure of what to think of that, although it certainly didn’t bother me or distract me. Finally I began to feel good about living in a time when art can organically encompass these seemingly disparate elements.
    At the end of Act II, Poe is collapsed up-stage, in front of the curtain with the lights up – the ranger (or Louis CK character, as I call it) sympathetically/patronizingly/ineffectually rubs his back in that peculiar modern fashion we have of demonstrating physical solace, (not so much physical contact so as to bring up a low suit!). He asks us to feel sympathy for Poe – it is touching, it brings us out of the convention of the play, provides information about Poe’s last days and creates juxtapositions between our age with our social conventions, means of expression and values versus Poe’s.
    Very thoughtful and inventive production – I would highly recommend it.

    Reply
  5. Geoffrey PingreeFebruary 15, 2014 at 12:26 pm

    It was like madness.
    Very moved by the production (warning, there may be a few spoilers in the following)
    Very inventive musically, aurally, visually and in terms of movement and use of set – very atmospheric, dark – a true ‘gesamtkunstwerk’.
    I was unaware of the strangeness of Poe’s last days or of his final work ‘Eureka’. A very compelling evocation of madness, almost frighteningly so. The effect reminded me of Berlioz ’ Symphonie Fantastique’.
    Strange, and interesting Louis CK character interleaved with the action – At first I was not sure of what to think of that, although it certainly didn’t bother me or distract me. Finally I began to feel good about living in a time when art can organically encompass these seemingly disparate elements.
    At the end of Act II, Poe is collapsed up-stage, in front of the curtain with the lights up – the ranger (or Louis CK character, as I call it) sympathetically/patronizingly/ineffectually rubs his back in that peculiar modern fashion we have of demonstrating physical solace, (not so much physical contact so as to bring up a low suit!). He asks us to feel sympathy for Poe – it is touching, it brings us out of the convention of the play, provides information about Poe’s last days and creates juxtapositions between our age with our social conventions, means of expression and values versus Poe’s.
    Very thoughtful and inventive production – I would highly recommend it.

    Reply
  6. Really enjoyed – staging/acting unlike anything I’ve seen. The one problem I’m compelled to mention is that my friend was using the audio assist device you provided and it didn’t work. Not only did it not work for her, it was VERY audible and distracting to the people around her.

    Reply
  7. Beautiful music and overall creative use of sound, wonderful scene-setting, great artistic sensibilities somewhat oddly mixed with slapstick humor. With that said, this show offers one of the worst representations of the historic Poe I’ve ever seen. Judging by previous comments above, it is unfortunate that people believe much of this show is based on truth (i.e. that he was deranged, insane, delusional, disturbed, melancholy, death-obsessed, drug-addicted, alcohol abuser, etc). But an enjoyable show, presuming you know nothing about literary history, the 19th century, or the National Park Service’s EDAL site.

    Reply
  8. Joan LancourtFebruary 17, 2014 at 11:44 am

    The visual images, the artifice, the moving in and out of time, the non-lyric physicality of Poe and his dead wife, the shifts in music all interacted to create an always compelling experience. I knew about Poe’s last days, but I believe the play’s goal was to give you a taste of his experience of those last days – disjointed, urgent, painful, mournful, all colored by a life full of disappointments, and desperation. Strangely absent though was any sense of self doubt. The last scene with him laid out on a plank on top of the open piano, all reflected in the large mirror with the others ‘playing’ the piano strings with long cords was worth the whole production – a visual image so powerful and riveting it is seared into my brain.

    Reply
  9. Brilliant – imaginative – like a bridge or a portal from our 21 century life into the tortured psyche and last days of E.A Poe.

    It’s funny that I complained to my wife of disappointment in having a park ranger introduce the show with background information. However, disappointment quickly turned to engaging wonder as soon as the curtain opened and he brought us right into the stage and life of this very personal journey.

    I have been a huge fan of Poe and was excited to see AE’s version of this unusual story, and it was exactly what I imagined it would be: imaginative, provocative, engaging, dark, and creative. I loved the dancing and every bit of the music. The staging was reminiscent of Brook – taking minimal sets and props and creating intricate passageways, steps, rooms, nooks and crannies, trains and stations, allies, front yards, bedrooms – out of nothing. The trip from the hotel lobby up to a tiny room was amazing, and for me a metaphor through Poe’s mind and inner self.
    The music was extraordinary (I’m a musician & actor). I loved seeing the music right out on the stage and the actors taking part in this, and all aspects of the creative process as the story unfolded. The music was just enough and only supported and gave more depth to the action of Poe’s inner tyranny, delusion, insanity, and creative genius; and the difficult outer journey that he was taking.
    Sophie Bortolussi’s dancing was the best part of the show! The images of her movement and positions immediately brought my minds’ eye right into Poe’s tortured psyche. In it, I felt like I was seeing flashes of Poe’s hallucinations all around him. It also gave depth to his love and longing, and his visceral need for his dead wife. I loved that she uttered not a single word, yet I felt as if I had a clear understanding of her thoughts and actions throughout.
    Bright Kudos to Thaddeus Phillips, Lucidity and the brilliant cast of Red-Eye!

    In retrospect, I could have done without the introduction from the gentleman from AE. Let the art speak for itself. None the less, I’m an AE member and I look forward to the rest of this season and more to come…bravo.

    Reply

Your email address will not be published.