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PARKING PARTNERS

Articles by Andrea Gordillo

  By James Blaszko FILMS Courte-tête (1957) While aboard the Rhinedam in 1957 en route to her Fullbright fellowship at Oxford, Sontag watched many films in the ship’s cinema. In her journals it is clear that she generally disliked many of its offerings. Among the various “stinkers,” however, she wrote that Courte-tête, a recently released French film, was “rather clever.”  The comedy follows a phlegmatic crook as he preys on racing enthusiasts to make a fortune….

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Moe Angelos, adaptor and performer of Sontag: Reborn, recounts her experience of exploring the intellectual’s personal library and journals. The collection resides at the UCLA libraries and is available to the general public free of charge: In August of 2011, I had the privilege of visiting Los Angeles for ten days of a nosy wander in the Special Collections division of the UCLA Libraries. I was on a research mission for what was to become…

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  By Thea Rodgers As our world of technology progresses, artists are pushing the boundaries of what can be done in theater. At the beginning of the season we watched Charleroi Danses create a film even as it was being projected live onstage in Kiss & Cry; then, in House / Divided, we got to see The Builders Association pioneer new uses for augmented reality technology and integrate complex projections into their work. While some…

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  By Thea Rodgers Eva Shain Eva Shain was the first woman to work a professional fight at Madison Square Garden when she became the first woman to judge a heavyweight championship boxing match—between Ernie Shavers and Muhammad Ali, no less. She was also one of the first women in New York to get her license to judge professional boxing matches from the New York State Athletic Commission. Read more about Eva Shain. Lucia Rijker…

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By Thea Rodgers Domestic violence, as defined by the victims’ service agency SafeHorizon, is “a pattern of behavior used to establish power and control over another person through fear and intimidation.” Such behavior is all too common in the United States, especially in our entertainment. The Wholehearted takes on the question of why we happily consume and condone this violence and tackles the complexities of what our depictions on stage and screen reflect about our…

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