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PARKING PARTNERS

Articles by David Dower

Those of you who have become regulars around here will recognize /peh-LO-tah/ and See You Yesterday as prime examples of what we offer to Boston. From the outset we have aimed to bring revelatory and relevant stories from around the world that connect audiences to the diverse cultures that make up this vibrant city. If you are new to us, ArtsEmerson aims to present programs that help you explore the world, and discover your own,…

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As the curtain rises on An Inspector Calls, a centerpiece of our ninth season, we are busily putting the finishing touches on our next: the 10th! It’s hard to imagine that the time has flown so quickly. If you are new to the ArtsEmerson community, it may seem we’ve always been here. But we were launched by Emerson College to coincide with the opening of the Paramount Center, quickly establishing ourselves as a home for…

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Now in our ninth season, ArtsEmerson has established a reputation for putting the world on stage here in Boston. We take pride in offering audiences access to artists and cultures from around the globe that would otherwise not be seen in the city. ArtsEmerson’s seasons are an opportunity for the adventurous and the curious to explore the world. People frequently ask me how we even choose these shows, they seem so consistently different from each…

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The quiet weeping. The convulsive laughter. The surge of sympathy for a character that suddenly turns to empathy when you realize it’s your story they are telling. Beauty. Intelligence. Grace. Courage. The capacity for surprise. I love the theater. Art is one of the distinguishing capacities of the human— both to make it and to be reached by it. And, in the theater there is a doubling of its power. The art is live, in…

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In her 1989 book Aids and Its Metaphors, Susan Sontag set about trying to discuss the AIDS pandemic in intellectualized terms, focusing on the mythologizing frames that created distance for the unafflicted, blamed its victims, and inflamed the dialogue surrounding it. She got clobbered by AIDS activists and many of her colleagues for taking something so voracious, so visceral, so immediate and putting it under a literary microscope. AIDS was no metaphor.     I…

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