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Race and Equity

Fifty four years after his assassination, the name Malcolm X still reverberates with the ethos of dogged intolerance to oppression. His name is an evocation — a recalling of a man, minister, and activist who stood vociferously for ideals of black nationalism and black empowerment, and — at the height of the Civil Rights Movement — sought to liberate the black community from the spiritual, political, social, and economic confines willfully imposed by a segregated,…

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During our 2017/2018 Season, we co-produced The White Card written by Claudia Rankine with the American Repertory Theatre. A monumental work of theatre, Rankine’s words resonated with audiences and prompted inquisitive questioning showcasing the power of a skilled writer. As we inched closer to opening night, ArtsEmerson had conducted a book club of Rankine’s work to offer audiences an even deeper experience called Citizen Read. Gathering communities from Boston and Cambridge, nearly 1300 people all…

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To celebrate our 10th Anniversary Season, Executive Director David Howse sat down with Comcast Newsmakers for an interview to discuss how ArtsEmerson’s beginnings and where we are headed next. Howse discusses our engagement and community building efforts, reimagining how we respond to our audiences, and to continue our mission of celebrate our place in the world and explore how we each can contribute to its transformation through the arts.

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The Magic Flute is a title that many recognize, or at least have heard in reference to operatic history, Mozart’s compositions, or even seen it on a marquee as they passed by the theatre. There also often is a certain connotation of inaccessibility attached to classic works, and in opera especially. However, Isango Ensemble’s The Magic Flute opens up a dialogue about language, access, and storytelling beyond words. “It was very important, I felt, that…

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I am of an age that the name Robert Mapplethorpe sets off a visceral reaction in me. I was coming of age as an artist, an activist, a husband, and a father in San Francisco in 1989 when Mapplethorpe’s The Perfect Moment tour erupted into a controversy so heated it threatened the very existence of the National Endowment for the Arts. I was not aware at the time of Boston’s place in that story. Not…

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