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PARKING PARTNERS

By Magda Romanska Boston has always been the trendiest town in the U.S. and when it comes to coffeehouses, it’s no exception. Although the first man known to bring knowledge of coffee to North America was Captain John Smith in 1607, who was familiar with coffee, thanks to his travels in Turkey, the first-ever coffeehouse in America was actually opened in Boston by John Sparry. As Boston city records indicate, in October 1676 John Sparry…

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By Magda Romanska American scholars have long noted the comparative scarcity of informal public spaces in American social and cultural life. In the last few decades, the public sphere, parks, streets, squares and walkways have become the domain of the poor and the homeless. Many sociologists lament that, increasingly, Americans are expected to find respite, entertainment, companionship, and even safety almost exclusively within the privacy of their homes (with mega mansions – featuring tennis courts…

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In anticipation of The Andersen Project, Emerson professor Magda Romanska talks to Lawrence Switzky, professor of English and drama at The University of Toronto and author of The Rise of the Theatre Director: Negotiations with the Material World.  Prof. Switzky specializes in modern and contemporary dramatic literature, the history of directing, technology and media studies, and modernism. MR: Robert Lepage is considered by some to be one of the most innovative theatre directorsof our times. …

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By Magda Romanska The first American coffee house opened in Boston in 1676. Right away, beginning in the late seventeenth century, coffee houses in Boston and New York served as auction houses for commodities and real estate. Beginning in 1729, a coffee house was located next to the Merchants Exchange in New York, and in 1752 the newly erected Exchange building also hosted the Exchange Coffee Room. Another famous New York Merchants’ Coffee House was…

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By Corrie Glanville FILMS/THEATRE Man on a Tightrope (1953) The intrigue of a Czech circus is the center of this 1950s classic directed by Elia Kazan; in 1952 Czechoslovakia Karel Cernik (Frederic March)  struggles to keep together his beloved Cirkus Cernik, which belonged to his family before being nationalized by the Communist government. The government allows Cernik to manage the circus, but he struggles with deteriorating conditions, loss of his workers to the state and…

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