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PARKING PARTNERS

history

Next month, ArtsEmerson welcomes back Manual Cinema with The End of TV, as we witness a friendship unfold between two women. Flo, an elderly woman suffering from the onset of dementia, and Louise, a younger African-American woman recovering from economic hardship, have seemingly different life experiences. Despite their differences, both women worked at the same local factory; Flo, during World War II, and Louise, just recently laid off. This connection prompted us to look into…

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The Poland that the world knows today is relatively new, with several revolutions and occupations scattered throughout the country’s thousand year history; the story of the country and its changing borders and governments create a complicated cultural timeline, with pieces of Polish literature, music, art and other artifacts lost to time. Here’s a very brief look through some of Poland’s historical milestones. The Baptism of a Polish State In the mid 10th century, Duke Mieszko…

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William Shakespeare was a man of many mysteries. Despite being the most well known author in history, historians know relatively little about Shakespeare’s personal life. There are strewn facts and unusual circumstances that cloud the playwright, from questioning the authorship of his plays and poems to his family life in Stratford-upon-Avon. However, we do know Shakespeare had one son. His name was Hamnet. Hamnet Shakespeare was born in the early months of 1585 to William…

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The Great Migration started just before the United States entered the first World War, and extended into the 1970s–but what part did Boston play in this massive movement of African Americans to the north? During the first half of the twentieth century, Boston’s small but vocal African American population began to expand—by 13.3% between 1910 and 1940 according to U.S. census data. Immigrants from the West Indies and migrants from the south and west, including…

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The Great Migration was a exodus of around six million African Americans between 1915-1970 from the South to the North in an attempt to escape racist ideologies and practices, and to create new lives as American citizens. Dubbed one of the largest internal movements in the history of the United States, the Great Migration was driven by the duality of a post-slavery life in the U.S.: while no longer slaves, African Americans in the South…

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