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How To Be A Rock Critic

  Lester Bangs never lived in Boston; by all accounts he probably never even visited The Hub. But in the middle of the critical and audience rave—How To Be A Rock Critic—we’ve dug through his writing to find out what the legendary rock critic thought of the music scene and rock criticism coming out of Boston in the sixties and seventies from afar.   Bangs credited local band Black Pearl with developing the genre that…

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“Record stores can’t save your life. But they can give you a better one.” – Nick Hornby As streaming services become the dominant source for people’s daily musix-fix, when so many brick & mortar record stores struggle to stay in business through out the country, Boston is quite lucky to have so many unique, thriving record stores all around the city. We are proud to host two of Boston’s best record stores in the lobby…

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Lester Bangs is one of the most well-known critics of his generation because he epitomized the art form of writing about art. Obsessed with music, Bangs wrote: “Ultimately being a ‘critic’ just means wanting to inflict your tastes on other people. It’s a very honest impulse: I simply want you to like the same things I like. I need you to like them. Then I will not be alone.” Criticism is the art of persuasion,…

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  He helped popularize musical terms like “Punk Rock” and “Heavy Metal.” He’s been called “America’s greatest rock critic” and was fired from Rolling Stone Magazine for being “too mean” to the bands. Contrarian and cantankerous: Do you know Lester Bangs? For some, the most well-known cultural touchstone for Bangs is the largely adored Cameron Crowe film “Almost Famous” where Bangs was as portrayed by Philip Seymour Hoffman. For others, it’s Bangs’ revered and widely…

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  The title of the one-man-show about Lester Bangs– How To Be A Rock Critic –is taken from a snarky self-deprecating piece the infamous music critic wrote for a Buffalo publication called Shakin’ Street Gazette in 1974. But on the heels of the production arriving in Boston this week, we were delighted to find out that this piece originally appeared in Boston alternative newspaper The Real Paper in 1973, albeit under a different title. Former Boston Phoenix…

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