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The White Card

Making visible the invisible is a formidable task, and that’s what Claudia Rankine set to out to do when she wrote her new play, The White Card. The story aims to start a conversation about race focused on whiteness and its unseeable impact on the world. Rankine is one among an army of artists channeling their creative energy into artistic works that make the invisible apparent, bringing a new perspective to discussion of race in America. Here…

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Claudia Rankine’s The White Card poses the question “Can American society progress if whiteness stays invisible?” While the play analyzes and criticizes the way racism is pervasive in everyday culture, it also takes the time to look at visual art and how we interpret art as a medium of understanding. An influential, art-collecting couple invite Charlotte, an up- and-coming African-American artist, to dinner in the hopes of purchasing her work for their esteemed collection. The…

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“The moment you enter [the theater] you will feel different…It’s not often that theater, as a looking glass, is this crystal clear” – Jared Bowen, WGBH Tickets for the World Premiere of The White Card are becoming quite hard to come by even though the show has three more weeks of performances. Here’s the best advice for snagging access for this stunning play by Claudia Rankine: Check online or call the box office 1-2 days…

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    Hello, hello Deaf community, theatre community, interpreter community! Paramount Theatre in Boston would like to let you know about an upcoming ASL interpreted production called “The White Card.” The show will take place on Saturday, March 31st at 2:00PM. The interpreters are Chris Robinson and Shari Coon. The play is about a married couple of whom both are White. The husband, Charles is very knowledgeable about a lot of things, is deeply involved…

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  A few years ago, poet Claudia Rankine gave a reading of “Citizen: An American Lyric,’’ her 2014 award-winning collection of poems exploring racism and aggression. During the question-and-answer period, a white man stood up. “He said he had been moved by ‘Citizen” and he wanted to know what he could do for me,” Rankine recalls. “I said that I was doing very well, thank you. The real question he should have asked was ‘What…

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